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Monitoring and evaluating advocacy: lessons from Oxfam GB's Climate Change campaign

Monitoring and evaluating advocacy: lessons from Oxfam GB's Climate Change campaign
10 pages

Authors
Starling, Simon

Editors
Eade, Deborah
Journal
Development in Practice Volume 20 Issue 2

Publication date
01 Apr 2010

DOI
10.1080/09614520903564215

Publisher
Oxfam GB
Routledge

Type
Journal article

This article examines Oxfam GB's learning from its attempts to improve monitoring and evaluation (M&E) processes within a global advocacy campaign. It outlines the Climate Change campaign team's practical experience of piloting different approaches to M&E, and the lessons emerging from the process. The experience suggests that while some 'traditional' elements of M&E are helpful in advocacy work, a greater focus on light, real-time monitoring systems is necessary. The findings highlight the organisational as well as methodological challenges of integrating M&E into advocacy campaigns: without a culture that rewards reflection and learning, improvements in staff capacities or data-collection systems will not be sustained. Indeed, the process of improving M&E practice mirrors that of an advocacy campaign itself, requiring analysis of power relations, opportunities, and constraints; monitoring of progress; and adapting plans on the basis of on-going learning. Finally, the article suggests possible ways forward, based on experience.

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