John Magrath

Programme Researcher

John Magrath

John has worked for Oxfam GB for over 25 years in a variety of roles. His background is a journalist and writer. Since joining the Policy Research Team, he has looked particularly at climate change and its implications for Oxfam GB's work, and also at renewable energy. 

He has recently worked with Practical Action and Christian Aid to complete a field guide to using renewable energy, which aims to help development practitioners deliver energy access projects worldwide. You can view this resource here: http://practicalaction.org/iret

All posts by John Magrath

Women and children eating

Hidden hunger: South Africans speak out on World Food Day

On World Food Day John Magrath shares the findings of an Oxfam South Africa report which reveals that one in four citizens are going hungry. The causes of poverty, the cost of food, and related issues...

"Chorti" Indigenous woman of the community of Tunuco Arriba Jocotan (Guatemala). Saul Martinez/Oxfam

Could coffee rust and El Niño cause hunger for millions?

John Magrath explains how poor coffee harvests and drought are already threatening millions in Central America with hunger. Now, with meteorologists predicting an onset of El Niño later this year,...

credit: Nick Danziger/Oxfam, Ethiopia Food Crisis

How climate change made the development agenda

How did climate change rise up the agenda of the UK's environment and development agencies? Oxfam's Programme Researcher John Magrath reflects on the 'Up in Smoke' coalition and the...

A satellite image of the super El Niño of 1997-1998. The seesaw-like effect of an El Niño, with sea level along the equator down in the west and up in the eastern Pacific, can be seen in this image. White and red indicate higher-than-normal sea levels (warm water) and purple represents lower-than-normal sea height and cooler water. Credit: NASA/JPL

Increase in super El Niños will impact the poorest most

Scientists may have cracked a big climate puzzle:  whether rising global temperatures will influence the weather phenomenon known as El Niño. Unfortunately, the answer is probably yes. Here,...

Muhammed Abrahim in his destroyed field in Shikapur, Sindh Province, which he can no longer cultivate. Credit: Timothy Allen/Oxfam

Four years of floods have left Pakistan hungry – getting real about the human cost of climate change

As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) release their report on the physical science behind climate change, John Magrath reminds us of the harsh reality of regional...

Aminata Yero uses her hands to make mud channels for irrigation in Mauritania. Credit: Pablo Tosco/Intermon Oxfam

A hotter world is a hungrier world

The latest assessment of global climate change enters a new phase today as scientists and civil servants gather in Stockholm to discuss the new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change...

Rolling bidis by kerosene. Credit: SKRDPD

How good microfinance is funding sustainable energy in India

Microfinance sometimes gets a bad press but SKDRDP, this year's Ashden Gold Award winner, is a well-run microfinance organisation helping to meet the energy needs of low-income households in...

Adjusting the blade angle of Feyzabad's hydro turbine. Credit: GIZ/Ashden

Local energy provides peace, prosperity and accountability where big projects fail

Ahead of next week's Ashden Awards, John Magrath examines how one winner has brought electricity and employment to remote provinces of Afghanistan, showing that small projects that respond to...

Hasina Begum, Char Atra, Shariatpur, Bangladesh. Credit: Shehab Uddin

Seasonality is back in season

"Seasonality" has re-emerged as a topic in development after a long lull - but will it gain more traction this time round? ...

Solar panels used in a permaculture project in Indonesia

New help in using renewables to promote energy access

A new resource offers help to development practitioners worldwide wishing to know more about using renewable energy.  ...